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Editorial: Pimp Sirgiorgio Clardy’s $100 Million Dangerous Shoe Lawsuit Against Nike Thrown Out

Sirgiorgiro Clardy filed a $100,000 lawsuit against mega-shoe manufacturer Nike because he reportedly felt that there should have been a warning issued about the Air Jordans he wore to stomp those who failed to fork over money to one of his prostitutes in June 2012. The pimp claims the shoes were dangerous, potential weapons and the company should have made him and others aware of it via a consumer warning label. A Portland, Ore., judge, however, thought the lawsuit against the athletic giant was ludicrous and tossed it out, according to The Oregonian.

Clardy received a sentence of 100 years in prison for beating the unnamed man outside of a motel so badly that he needed reconstructive surgery on his face and stitches.

The hearing for the lawsuit was held on September 17th, and Nike had three attorneys present in the court to argue their defense against the dangerous shoe allegations. According to the Oregonian, Tim Coleman, one of the three Nike attorneys, said at the hearing, “There’s no defect in the shoes. There’s no…evidence of defect or dangerous condition of these shoes when used normally.”

Clardy also struck the woman whom the man skipped out on so hard, blood streamed from her ears.

Instead of hiring an attorney to represent him, Clardy chose to do the job himself and rambled on for 23 minutes at the hearing until the presiding judge, Robert Durham, could no longer tolerate it. Judge Durham reportedly put an end to Clardy’s nonsensical verbal diarrhea and tossed the silly lawsuit out stating, “You’ve wasted my time here, Mr. Clardy. We’ve bent over backward to give you a chance.”

News source courtesy of NewsOne!!!

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